Top 101 healing Herbs and Spices

SUBHEAD: Over a hundred herbs and spices that can be consumed or used topically for healing.

By Dr. Josh Axe on 10 December 2017 in Nexus Newsfeed -
(https://nexusnewsfeed.com/article/health-healing/the-top-101-herbs-and-spices-for-healing/)


Image above: A mortar and pestle with various healing herbs. From original article.

Did you know that there are over a hundred herbs and spices that can be consumed or used topically for healing?

These natural foods possess a number of beneficial properties and work to reduce inflammation, improve the health of your heart, boost your immune system, and even prevent and fight cancer. With so many natural remedies at your disposal, the need for prescription medications goes down considerably.

In fact, in the field of herbal medicine, naturally occurring, plant-derived substances are used to treat illnesses within local or regional healing practices. Well-known systems of herbal medicine like Traditional Chinese Medicine and Ayurvedic Medicine believe in the central idea that there should be an emphasis on health rather than on disease.

By using healing herbs and spices, people can thrive and focus on their overall conditions, rather than on a particular ailment that typically arises from a lack of equilibrium of the mind, body and environment.

Therefore, I suggest that you bulk up your spice cabinet and start cooking with fresh herbs that provide therapeutic components you probably didn’t realize were there.

There are also some more obscure herbs and spices that can be found in tea, extract, capsule and tablet forms to relieve specific conditions, from infertility and menopause symptoms, to diabetes, liver disease and cognitive decline. The possibilities are limitless!

101 Herbs & Spices for Healing the Body

1. Aloe Vera
Aloe vera contains vitamins and minerals that are needed for the proper function of all body systems. It also contains enzymes, laxative compounds, anti-inflammatory fatty acids, and wound healing hormones. Aloe vera can be used to soothe skin irritations, burns, wounds and rashes, treat cold sores, moisturize your hair and scalp and reduce inflammation when used topically. When taken internally, aloe vera works to relieve constipation, aid digestion, boost your immune system and even improve diabetes symptoms. (1)

2. Anise
The seed and oil of anise can be used to relieve several health conditions. Anise aids digestion, works as an anti-flatulence agent, and can be used to relieve coughs and colds. It can also increase urine flow, stimulate your appetite, ease menstrual discomfort, increase sex drive and increase milk production in women who are breastfeeding. (2)

3. Annatto
Annatto is derived from the seeds of the achiote tree, and it’s often used as a coloring agent because of its bright color that ranges from yellow to deep orange. Aside from its ability to color food naturally, annatto also contains antimicrobial properties and antioxidants, making it useful for killing bacteria, aiding wound healing, supporting your cardiovascular and eye health, and protecting your liver. Some people may have an allergy or intolerance to annatto, so introduce it into your diet slowly to make sure it doesn’t cause any adverse reactions. (3)

4. Arrowroot
Arrowroot is the starch that’s obtained from the rhizomes of a perennial herb called Maranta arundinacea. It can be used to aid digestion, treat urinary tract infections, help to fight foodborne pathogens, relieve mouth pain and boost your immune system. The best way to use arrowroot for healing is to take it internally by mixing the powder into juice or any other beverage. (4)

5. Asafoetida
Asafoetida is a resinous gum that’s derived from the perennial fennel plant. You can use asafoetida in powder form to relieve chest congestion and asthma, treat digestive issues like IBS, diarrhea, constipation and gassiness, regulate your blood sugar levels and lower your blood pressure. You can add powdered asafoetida to soups and stews, or purchase it as a supplement in tincture or capsule form. (5)

6. Ashwagandha
Ashwagandha is an adaptogenic herb that can lower cortisol levels and balance your thyroid hormones. It has also been proven effective in supporting your adrenal function, helping you to overcome adrenal fatigue that occurs when your adrenals are overtaxed by stress. Some other ashwagandha benefits include its ability to support your brain health, improve your mood, increase your stamina and inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells. (6)

7. Astragalus Root
Astragalus root has been used in Traditional Chinese Medicine for thousands of years. It’s an adaptogenic herb that helps the body to fight off stress and disease. It boosts the health and function of your immune, cardiovascular and respiratory systems, helps to heal wounds, prevents diabetes, slows the growth of tumors and alleviates symptoms of chemotherapy. The antioxidants found in astragalus root help you to combat disease and aging due to free radical damage. You can find astragalus in many forms, including as a tincture, capsule or topical ointment. (7)

8. Barberry
Barberry is a berberine-containing plant that is used to fight infections due to its antibacterial, antifungal and antiprotozoal properties. Barberry can also be used to prevent and treat diabetes, aid digestion, cleanse your liver and gallbladder, and improve your cardiovascular health by improving hypertension, cardiac arrhythmias and ischemic heart disease. (8)

9. Basil
Basil is an aromatic herb in the mint family that anti-inflammatory, anti-stress and antibacterial properties. It also works as a pain reliever, blood vessel protector, immune booster and cancer fighter. Basil contains essential oils that are rich in antioxidants and are responsible for the many benefits of basil. (9)

10. Bay Leaf
Bay leaves come from the ancient tree Laurus nobilis, and it’s often used in cooking because of its distinctive savory flavor. Bay leaf has antimicrobial, antifungal and antioxidant properties. It can be used to help fight cancer, improve insulin function, improve cholesterol levels, prevent candida, treat dandruff, improve skin infections and support wound healing. (10)

11. Berberine
Berberine is a natural alkaloid that’s found in a variety of traditional herbs, including barberry, goldenseal and turmeric. It’s sold as an extract that can be used to fight bacteria, helping to treat conditions that are conventionally treated with antibiotics. Berberine also works as a natural remedy for diabetes, high cholesterol, heart disease, obesity, Alzheimer’s disease, lung inflammation, SIBO and cancer. (11)

12. Black Cohosh
The roots and rhizomes of black cohosh, a flowering plant native to North America, are used to treat or relieve a number of hormonal issues, including menopause symptoms like hot flashes, trouble sleeping and bone loss. Black cohosh provides a safe alternative to hormone replacement therapy, which is often used for menopause relief, and it can also help women manage PCOS and treat uterine fibroids. (12)

13. Black Currant
Black currant is a small shrub that belongs to the gooseberry family of plants. The bush produces dark purple, nutrient-dense berries that are loaded with vitamin C. These berries are rich in anthocyanins, which possess many health-promoting properties, including the ability to prevent obesity, heart disease, cancer and diabetes. Eating black currant berries can also promote eye health, kill pathogens and viruses, and boost your immune system. (13)

14. Boldo
Peurnus boldus, more commonly known as boldo, is a Chilean tree that has been used for thousands of years for its medicinal benefits. It’s an effective antioxidant that can be used to prevent diseases caused by free radical damage. Boldo is known to relieve gastrointestinal issues, bladder infections, gallstones and liver disease. It also works as a diuretic, increasing urine flow and promoting detoxification. (14)

15. Borage
Borage is a plant that’s used for medicinal purposes. The flowers, leaves and oil from the seeds can be used to improve skin conditions like eczema, reduce fever, and relieve conditions like cough, rheumatoid arthritis and pain caused by inflammation. Borage oil contains high amounts of GLA, a type of omega-6 fatty acid that is helpful for treating a wide range of health issues, like PMS symptoms, ADHD, bone loss, hormone imbalances, respiratory conditions, heart disease and stroke. (15)

 16. Boswellia Seratta
Extracts derived from tress of the genus called boswellia contain powerful compounds that reduce inflammation, fight cancer and prevent heart disease. Use boswellia extract to improve your immunity, reduce arthritis pain, speed up healing and prevent autoimmune disease. (16)

17. Bupleurum
Bupleurum is a plant that has been used in Traditional Chinese Medicine to promote detoxification for over 2,000 years. You can also use bupleurum to improve the health of your liver, boost adrenal gland function, treat depression associated with PMS or menopause, relieve seizures and fight ovarian cancer. (17)

18. Burdock Root
Burdock is a biennial plant in the daisy family. The root contains health-promoting antioxidants including quercetin, luteolin and phenolic acids. It can be consumed in powdered, fresh, dried or tea form to promote detoxification and circulation, strengthen the lymphatic system, protect you against diabetes and heal skin conditions like acne, eczema and psoriasis. Burdock root is also used to combat cancer and improve arthritis. (18)

19. Calendula
Calendula is a plant that’s taken orally and used topically to treat or relieve a number of health concerns. It possesses powerful anti-inflammatory capabilities, helps to speed healing, relaxes muscle spasms and improves oral health. Calendula also contains antimicrobial and antiviral properties, and research shows that it can be used to relieve irritations from cancer treatments like radiation and chemotherapy. (19)

20. Cardamom
Cardamom is made from the seed pods of various plants in the ginger family. It’s rich in phytonutrients and manganese, supplying 80 percent of your daily manganese requirement with just one tablespoon. Consuming ground cardamom can help to fight bad breath and the formation of cavities, lower your blood pressure, improve diabetes symptoms, aid your digestive system and fighting cancer. (20)

21. Cat’s Claw
Cat’s claw is a wood vine that grows in the Amazon rainforest. It has antioxidant, antiviral, anti-inflammatory and anti-mutagenic properties. You can use cat’s claw in extract, capsule, tablet and tea form to combat arthritis, improve digestive problems, boost immunity, lower blood pressure, improve DNA damage and fight cancer. (21)

22. Cayenne Pepper
Cayenne pepper is a shrub that makes hollow fruit that grows into long pods. These pods are available in fresh, dried or powdered form and valued for their many health benefits. Cayenne can be used to support digestion, prevent blood clots, relieve migraine, nerve and joint pain, promote detoxification, improve allergy symptoms and support weight loss. (22)

23. Chamomile
Chamomile plants are used to improve several health conditions, including allergies, insomnia, anxiety, depression, arthritis and gastrointestinal disorders. Chamomile benefits also include its ability to help fight skin irritations, relieve toothaches, PMS symptoms and muscle spasms, reduce inflammation and heal wounds. (23)

24. Chicory Root
Chicory root is a plant-based starch that’s categorized as a soluble fiber and prebiotic. It is often taken as an extract or supplement to relieve digestive issues like constipation, diarrhea, IBS, gas and bloating. Chicory root also works as a natural remedy for managing diabetes, it protects the liver from toxicity and free radicals, reduces inflammation and relieves stress. (24)

 25. Chives
Chives, or Allium schoenoprasum, is a perennial plant that is closely related to scallions and leeks. Chives are often used as a flavoring herb, but they also act as a mild stimulant and diuretic. Chives also have antiseptic and antibacterial properties, and they work as a natural bug repellant. (25)

26. Cilantro
Cilantro is a versatile herb that contains many healing properties, including phytonutrients, phenolic compounds and flavonoids. Cilantro benefits include its ability to promote the detoxification of heavy metals, reduce anxiety, improve sleep, lower blood sugar levels, boost your heart health, support your digestion, promote skin health and fight free radical damage that can lead to a number of degenerative diseases. (26)

27. Cinnamon
Cinnamon is a spice that comes from the bark of the Cinnamomum tree. The compounds found in cinnamon and extracted to make cinnamon oil make this one of the most beneficial spices on earth. Cinnamon health benefits come from its anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antimicrobial, anti-diabetic, immune-boosting, heart-protecting and cancer-fighting properties. (27)

28. Comfrey
Comfrey is a perennial herb that can be used topically to relieve muscle and joint pain, reduce lower back pain and improve arthritis pain. It can also be used to speed wound healing and lessen skin irritations. Comfrey should only be used topically for up to 10 consecutive days. Ingesting this herb can cause liver damage. (28)

29. Coriander Seed
The dried seeds of the cilantro plant is known as coriander, which is commonly used as a whole or ground spice. Consuming coriander seeds can help to lower blood sugar levels, ease digestive issues, improve cholesterol levels, decrease blood pressure and prevent neurological disease. (29)

30. Cumin Seed
Cumin seeds come from the herb Cuminum cyminum, which is a member of the parsley family. Cooking with cumin seeds can aid your digestion, boost your immune system, promote the health of your skin, relieve respiratory conditions, promote detoxification, combat oxidative stress, fight infections and prevent diabetes. (30)

31. Curry Leaf
Curry leaves come from the curry tree that’s native to India and Sri Lanka. Using curry leaves for flavoring provides fiber, iron, and vitamins A, C and E. They can support the health of your heart, fight diabetes, prevent or fight infections, lower your cholesterol levels and prevent iron deficiency anemia. (31)

32. Devil’s Claw
Devil’s claw is derived from the dried root of the Harpogophytum procumbens plant. Devil’s claw contains antioxidant and antispasmodic properties. It’s commonly used to relieve arthritis pain because of its ability to reduce inflammation and ease pain. Some other devil’s claw benefits are digestive support and improved kidney health. (32)

33. Dill Weed
Dill weed belongs to the same family as bay leaf, parsley and cumin. Adding chopped or whole dill weed to your recipes can help to ease menstrual cramps, aid digestion, fight infections and lower cholesterol levels. Dill weed also has anticonvulsant properties, so it is used to treat epilepsy as well. (33)

34. Echinacea
Echinacea is a cornflower that’s native to North America and both the root of the plant and the part that grows above ground contain beneficial components. Echinacea is known for its ability to boost your immune system and reduce your chances of catching the common cold. It’s commonly used as a natural cold remedy, but it can also be used to alleviate pain, reduce inflammation, relieve constipation and improve skin problems. (34)

35. Fennel 
Fennel is a perennial herb that’s native to the Mediterranean and often used to support digestion. Dried fennel seeds and fennel seed oil are able to relieve digestive issues like gas, bloating, heartburn and colic in infants. Fennel benefits also include its ability to treat respiratory infections, improve eye health, ease menopausal symptoms, improve heart health and lower blood pressure. (35)

36. Fenugreek
Fenugreek is an annual herb that’s part of the pea family. It’s seeds and leaves are often used to reduce inflammation, aid digestion, improve cholesterol levels, improve glycemic control and boost exercise performance. In men, fenugreek is known to increase libido and in women who are breastfeeding, it can be used to promote milk flow. (36)

37. Feverfew
The dried leaves of the feverfew herb are used to ease migraine pain, treat fevers, heal skin issues like dermatitis, prevent blood clots and relieve arthritis pain. Feverfew effectively reduces inflammation and eases pain naturally, and women use it to improve issues with infertility, menstruation and childbirth. The leaves can be found in tablet, capsule and liquid extract forms. (37)

38. Fingerroot
Fingerroot is an herb that’s native to China and Southeast Asia. The rhizomes are consumed to reduce inflammation and inflammatory diseases, and the leaves are used for easing allergy symptoms and fighting infections. Fingerroot can also be beneficial in treating ulcers, working as a natural aphrodisiac and helping to heal wounds quickly. (38)

39. Galangal
Galangal is part of the ginger family, and it’s often used in Thai food. Some of the many galangal benefits include its ability to improve sperm count and function, reduce inflammation, fight and prevent infections, ease digestive issues and support cognitive health. Research shows that galangal also acts as a potentially revolutionary cancer-fighting agent, as it can has proven to effectively fight and prevent a broad number of cancers and tumors. (39)

40. Garam Masala
Garam masala is an Indian spice blend that commonly contains cinnamon, cardamom, black peppercorns, nutmeg, cumin, ginger, fennel, coriander and bay leaves. Using garam masala in your recipes can improve your digestion, fight diabetes, reduce inflammation, boost your heart health and may work to prevent cancer. (40)

41. Ginger Root
Ginger root is the rhizome of the Zingiber officinale plant that contains 115 different chemical components. It works as a potent antioxidant, reduces inflammation, boosts the immune system, supports digestion, reduces pain and lowers cholesterol levels. Ginger root benefits also include its ability to improve diabetes, reduce arthritis pain and fight cancer. (41)

42. Ginkgo Biloba
Ginkgo biloba is a natural extract that’s derived from the Chinese ginkgo tree. It contains flavonoids and terpenoids, both of which have strong antioxidant properties and can help to fight age-related diseases, like dementia and Alzheimer’s. Ginkgo biloba benefits also include its ability to fight depression and anxiety, ease PMS symptoms, relieves headaches, boost eye health, treat ADHD and
improve libido. (42)

43. Ginseng
Ginseng belongs to the genus Panax, and it’s used to reduce stress, improve brain function, reduce inflammation, aid weight loss, lower blood sugar levels, boost the immune system, support lung function, treat sexual dysfunction and prevent cancer. (43)

44. Goldenseal
The dried rhizomes and roots of goldenseal are used to make liquid extracts, capsules, tablets, teas and skin care products. Goldenseal can help to ease digestive issues, like diarrhea, constipation, peptic ulcers and gassiness, boost your immune system, support the health of your mouth and eyes, fight cancer and boost your heart health. (44)

45. Gotu Kola
Gotu kola belongs to the same plant family as parsley, celery and carrots. This herb commonly used in traditional Asian cuisines is loaded with antioxidants helps to repair skin conditions like psoriasis, reduce fever, improve blood circulation, reduces inflammation, eases depression and anxiety, and fights free radicals that can cause gastric ulcers. (45)

46. Holy Basil
Holy basil is an adaptogen herb that can be used to relieve or ease conditions like anxiety, hypothyroidism, adrenal fatigue and acne. Research shows that holy basil benefits also include its ability to fight cancer, control blood glucose levels and regulate cortisol levels. You can find holy basil in supplement form or drink tulsi tea for these benefits. (46)

47. Horehound
Horehound is a plant that belongs to the mint family. It’s known to work as a natural treatment for coughs because of its expectorant abilities. Horehound also has antiseptic, analgesic, antioxidant and appetite stimulating properties. It’s useful for relieving motion sickness and aiding digestion as well. (47)

48. Horny Goat Weed
Horney goat weed works as a natural aphrodisiac because of its ability to increase testosterone production and estrogen levels. You can use horny goat weed to improve your libido, boost your circulation, regulate your cortisol levels, prevent bone loss, increase lean muscle mass and treat conditions like erectile dysfunction and vaginal dryness. (48)

49. Horseradish Root
The root of the horseradish plant can be used to fight disease because of its antioxidant power. It also has antimicrobial and antibacterial properties, which help to boost your immune system and fight infections. Some other horseradish root benefits include its ability to ease respiratory issues, treat urinary tract infections, aid digestion, ease pain and possible prevent cancer. (49)

50: Hyssop
Hyssop is a healing plant that is commonly used to relieve digestive issues, improve appetite, fight infections, improve circulation, promote skin health and support the health of your liver and gallbladder. Hyssop can also help to prevent the common cold and ease respiratory conditions like asthma. Hyssop is available in capsules, teas and extracts. (50)

51. Juniper Berries
Juniper berries are female seed cones that come from juniper plants. They are an excellent source of antioxidants, helping to prevent and fight diseases that are caused by free radical damage. Juniper berries can also be used to fight skin and respiratory infections, improve the health of your skin, aid your digestion, boost the health of your heart, lower your blood sugar levels and help relieve
insomnia. (51)

52. Kava Root
Kava root is an herbal plant that is commonly used to ease anxiety, stress and insomnia. It also boosts the immune system, relieves headache and migraine pain, eases respiratory tract infections and may even play a role in cancer prevention. However, kava root comes with the potential for drug abuse and when taken by mouth, it can cause liver damage. (52)

53. Kudzu Root
Kudzu root contains phytochemicals that can help to fight disease that’s caused by inflammation and reduce signs of aging. Kudzu root can be used to treat alcoholism when used in appropriate doses, improve diabetes and cardiovascular health, ease digestive issues like diarrhea, and improve menopause symptoms like hot flashes and night sweats. (53)

54. Lemon Balm
Lemon balm is a plant in the mint family that possesses antibacterial, antidiabetic, anti-stress, anti-anxiety, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. It can be used to aid digestion, regulate an overactive thyroid, ease PMS symptoms, improve your sleep, boost your mood, and protect your heart and liver. (54)

55. Lemongrass
Lemongrass is an herb that has stimulating, soothing, balancing and relaxing properties. It can be used to fight fungal and bacterial infections, reduce inflammation, repel insects, ease stomach aches, boost energy, ease anxiety, reduce fevers, ease pain and stimulate menstrual flow. (55)

56. Licorice Root
Licorice root is an adaptogen herb that’s a member of the legume family. Licorice root extract can be used to relieve acid reflux and heartburn, regulate cortisol levels, boost immunity, fight viral and bacterial infections, ease PMS and menopause symptoms, relieve cough and sore throat with its expectorant and anti-inflammatory properties, and ease cramps due to its antispasmodic abilities. (56)

57. Maca Root
Maca root is considered a superfood because of its ability to make people feel more “alive.” It works to balance hormones naturally, increase fertility in both men and women, improve stamina, boost sexual function and boost energy levels. Maca root powder contains over 20 amino acids and 20 free-form fatty acids, allowing for its status as a superfood. (57)

58. Marigolds
The marigold flower is used to make herbal ointments, topical creams, tinctures and teas to treat a number of health conditions, including muscle cramps, eye inflammation, fungal infections, and skin conditions like eczema and dermatitis. Marigolds can also help to ease digestive issues, boost the immune system, reduce inflammation and fight cancer. (58)

59. Marshmallow Root
Marshmallow root has fibrous extracts that swell up in the body and form a gel-like substance that can work to reduce inflammation in the lining of the stomach. Marshmallow root can also be used to relieve dry coughs and colds, improve low saliva production, fight bacterial and respiratory infections, treat skin conditions and reduce joint pain that’s caused by inflammation. (59)

60. Milk Thistle
Milk thistle is a weed that has been used medicinally for over 2,000 years. It works by drawing toxins that can cause illness and disease out of the body. It can effectively decrease or even reverse damage that has been done to the liver because of pollution exposure, heavy metals and the use of prescription medications. Milk thistle benefits also include its ability to protect you against cancer, lower cholesterol levels, control diabetes and reduce signs of aging. (60)

61. Mint
Mint is one of the most popular medicinal herbs because it’s often seen in products like chewing gum and breath fresheners. Eating mint, drinking mint tea or using mint extracts can help to aid digestion, relieve headache pain, ease nausea, improve signs of depression and relieve respiratory conditions like chronic cough or asthma. (61)

62. Moringa
Throughout the world, just about every part of the moringa plant is used to treat a variety of health conditions, including diabetes, anemia, allergies, arthritis, epilepsy, thyroid disorders, high blood pressure, low sex drive and cancer. It has antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, antiparasitic, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, and it’s an excellent source of protein, vitamins A and C, potassium, calcium and amino acids. (62)

63. Mugwort
Mugwort is a plant that was traditionally used to help women relieve symptoms of menopause. Today, it’s used in a method called moxibustion to reverse the breech position of fetuses and alleviating joint pain. Mugwort is also helpful in treating in treating mild depression and attacking certain cancer cells. (63)

64. Mullein
Mullein is an herb that contains carbohydrates, proteins, fats, oils, flavonoids and tannins, just to name a few of its components. It can be used as a natural remedy for ear infections, to calm bursitis (fluid-filled sacs) in the shoulder, elbow and hip, kill bacteria, reduce inflammation, fight infections and help the body to get rid of mucus. (64)

65. Mustard Seed
Mustard seeds come from various mustard plants and they are used as a spice in many regions of the world. They are an excellent source of folate, vitamin A, calcium, potassium, magnesium and phosphorus. Plus, mustard seeds can reduce inflammation that causes pain and swelling, treat gum disease, boost the health of your heart, skin and hair, and help to prevent or fight infections due to their antibacterial and antifungal properties. Mustard oil is extracted from mustard seeds and can be used to reap these benefits, but there are some concerns about mustard oil toxicity. (65)

66. Nutmeg
Nutmeg is a spice that comes from the seeds of an evergreen tree. It is rich in vitamins and minerals like vitamin B6, thiamin, manganese, magnesium, folate and copper. When it’s used in small amounts when cooking or baking, nutmeg can help to aid digestion, ease pain, promote detoxification, boost cognitive function and regulating blood pressure levels. Although it’s uncommon, excessive ingestion of nutmeg can cause life-threatening toxicity. (66)

67. Olive Leaf
Olive leaf comes from the olive tree, and it is used in extracts, powders and teas to reduce inflammation, improve cardiovascular health, boost the immune system, prevent diabetes, support cognitive function, protect the skin, kill bacteria and fungi, reduce the risk of cancer and boost energy levels. (67)

68. Oregano
Oregano is an herb that has been used for healing for thousands of years. Oregano has the power to reduce inflammation, fight bacterial, fungal, viral and parasitic infections, fight allergies and even shrink tumors. Oil of oregano is extracted from the herb to make a powerful antibiotic agent that can kill many species of harmful bacteria. (68)

69. Paprika
Paprika is a spice that’s made from a variety of peppers in the Capsicum annuum family. Capsaicin, an ingredient in hot peppers that are used to make paprika, is known to support immune function and aid in treating autoimmune conditions. Paprika also contains many antioxidants, including carotenoids, that fight free radical damage that can cause disease, and it can be used to improve the health of your heart and eyes. (69)

70. Parsley
Parsley is an herb that can be used fresh or as a dried spice. It has the power to fight a number of health concerns, including bad breath, inflammation, kidney stones, digestive issues, skin problems, poor immunity, bladder infection and oxidative stress. Parsley is an excellent source of vitamins K, C and A, and it contains protective flavonoid antioxidants. (70)

71. Passion Flower
Passion flower is a plant that is used in tea, extract, infusion and tincture forms to relieve menopause symptoms like hot flashes and depression, reduce anxiety, improve sleep, reduce inflammation, lower blood pressure, regulate blood sugar levels and improve ADHD symptoms. (71)

72. Peppercorns
Peppercorns come from black pepper vines and they are dried and used as a spice. Peppercorns exhibit anti-diabetic, anti-cancer and antibacterial properties. They can also be used to aid digestion, lower blood pressure, improve cholesterol levels and reduce weight. (72)

73. Pimento
Pimento, which is known as allspice in some countries, comes from an evergreen tree and possesses pain-relieving, detoxifying, antibacterial, antioxidant and anti-stress properties. Pimento can also be used to promote blood circulation, reduce gassiness and boost the immune system. (73)

74. Pine Bark
Pine bark comes from the inner bark of the Pinus Pinaster tree and an extract is commonly used to make capsules, tablets, creams and lotions. Pine bark extract can be used to lower blood sugar levels, fight infections, help prevent hearing loss, improve erectile dysfunction, reduce inflammation, boost athletic performance and protect your skin from ultraviolet exposure. (74)

75. Psyllium Husk
Psyllium husk is an edible soluble fiber that comes from a shrub-like herb most common in India. It’s known for its ability to relieve digestive issues like constipation and diarrhea, and it can also be used to lower cholesterol and blood sugar levels, boost the health of your heart and help with weight management because it encourages a feeling of satiety. (75)

76. Raw Garlic
Garlic grows in the form of a bulb underneath a perennial plant that’s in the same family as chives, leeks, onions and scallions. Raw garlic fights diseases like cancer, heart disease, diabetes and dementia. It can also be consumed to lower blood pressure levels, fight infections and help to reverse hair loss. (76)

77. Red Clover
Red clover is a plant that belongs to the legume family. It can be used in extract form or in capsules to improve cardiovascular health, reduce menopausal symptoms, help you to maintain strong bones, reduce skin inflammation that causes conditions like eczema and psoriasis, fight respiratory conditions and lower your risk of certain cancers, such as prostate, endometrial and breast cancer. (77)

78. Rhodiola 
Rhodiola, which is also known as golden root, is an adaptogen herb that can help your body to adapt to physical, chemical and environmental stress. Rhodiola extract can be used to increase energy levels and boost athletic performance, lower cortisol levels that spike in times of stress, fight depression, improve brain function and burn belly fat. (78)

79. Rosemary
Rosemary is an aromatic herb that’s part of the mint family. It’s known for its ability to improve memory, promote hair growth, relieve muscle aches and pains, improve cognitive function and soothe digestive issues. Rosemary also possesses anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, antioxidant, detoxifying, anti-stress and healing properties. Rosemary can be chopped or ground and added to meals, or rosemary oil can be be diffused and applied topically. (79)

80. Saffron
The edible part of the saffron plant is the stigma, which is a long golden stalk that’s within the flower. The stigmas, or threads, can be used in cooking or ground saffron is available. Consuming saffron promotes cardiovascular health, alleviates symptoms of PMS, treats anxiety and depression, promotes satiety and can help with weight loss, treats erectile dysfunction and helps to prevent or treat cancer. (80)

81. Sage
Sage is a woody herb that’s closely related to rosemary and has been used medicinally for thousands of years. When consumed even in small amounts, sage can improve your memory and concentration, fight free radicals, prevent degenerative diseases like dementia and Alzheimer’s, reduce inflammation, prevent or improve diabetes, boost your immune system, improve the health of your skin and strengthen your bones. (81)

82. Sarsaparilla
Sarsaparilla is an herb that’s a member of the lily plant family. The plant’s roots are ground and used to make teas, tinctures and supplements that help to relieve respiratory conditions, treat skin problems like psoriasis, reduce pain caused by inflammation, improve libido, ease headache pain, aid digestion, reduce fevers and fight infections. Research shows that sarsaparilla also has anti-tumor and cancer-preventing effects. (82)

83. Sassafras
Sassafras is a tree that grows widely in North America and the compounds found in the bark have medicinal value. Studies indicate that sassafras may be an effective treatment for certain cancers, like liver, gastric, oral, breast, prostate and lung cancer. It can also help with the management of diabetes, fight parasites, improve blood circulation, improve symptoms of epilepsy and help with certain neurological diseases. (83)

84. Shilajit
Shilajit is a tar-like substance that can be found in the Himalayan and Tibet mountains. You can use shilajit powder, resin or supplements to reduce inflammation, fight infections, boost energy levels, regulate hormones, strengthen your immune system, support your skeletal health, boost the health of your heart and brain, aid in breaking addictions and help in managing diabetes. (84)

85. Skullcap
Skullcap is a plant in the mint family that can be used to alleviate anxiety, insomnia and hysteria, stimulate blood flow in the pelvic region, relieve muscle spasms, reduce inflammation and encourage menstruation. Research also suggests that skullcap, which is available in many forms, can help to fight cancer cells because of its ability to neutralize free radicals. (85)

86. Slippery Elm
Slippery elm is a tree that’s bark is used to make teas, capsules, tablets and lozenges. It can be used to ease digestive issues like diarrhea, constipation, IBS and bloating, lower stress and anxiety levels, aid weight loss, improve skin conditions like psoriasis and prevent breast cancer. You can also use slippery elm for pets to relieve their digestive problems and reduce inflammation. (86)

87. Sorrel
Sorrel is an herb that is used to add a tangy flavor to foods, but it also boasts health benefits because of its nutrient content and antioxidants, and its antimicrobial, cancer-preventing and immune-boosting properties. Sorrel can be used to reduce blood pressure, promote blood circulation, improve diabetes symptoms, support the health of your kidneys, improve skin conditions and relieve digestive issues. (87)

88. St. John’s Wort
St. John’s wort is an herb that’s most commonly used as a natural remedy for depression, anxiety and insomnia. It can also be effective in improving ADHD symptoms, treating heart palpitations, relieving obsessive-compulsive disorder and seasonal affective disorder, easing symptoms of menopause and boosting mood. (88)

89. Stinging Nettle 
Stinging nettle is a plant that’s native to Europe and Asia. Products made from the roots, stems and leaves of stinging nettle can help to improve urinary issues and benign prostatic hyperplasia, ease allergy symptoms and prevent reactions to hay fever, ease joint pain and symptoms of osteoarthritis, slow down bleeding after surgery and improve eczema symptoms. (89)

90. Tarragon
Tarragon is an herb that’s in the sunflower family and has a flavor similar to anise. Fresh and uncooked tarragon leaves can be used in cooking and tarragon essential oil is used to aid digestion and spark appetite. Tarragon can also be helpful in improving sleep, encouraging menstruation, fighting bacteria and relieving toothaches.  (90)

91. Thyme
Thyme is an herb that’s part of the mint family and is often used in cooking. Thyme is a source of vitamins and minerals like vitamin C, vitamin A, iron, manganese and calcium. It can be used to boost your mood, relieve respiratory conditions like sore throat and bronchitis, lower blood pressure and cholesterol levels, and fight cancer cells. (91)

92. Triphala 
Triphala is an herbal formulation that’s made from three fruits, amla, haritaki and bibhitaki. Dried powder from these fruits are mixed and when consumed, boast health benefits like lowering cholesterol levels, aiding weight loss, reducing inflammation, relieving constipation and fighting cancer. Triphala can also be taken as a tea, tablet and liquid supplement. (92)

93. Tulsi
Tulsi, which is also known as holy basil, is used in cooking and to make flavored water, juices and tulsi tea. When consumed, tulsi can help to treat skin diseases, eye diseases, chronic fever, respiratory conditions like bronchitis and bronchial asthma, arthritis, diarrhea and dysentery. Tulsi can also be used to improve bad breath, prevent cavities, ease headache pain and balance hormones naturally. (93)

94. Turmeric
Turmeric is the most powerful herb on the planet and its benefits are superior to those of conventional medications. Turmeric supplements can be taken in place of antidepressants, anticoagulants, arthritis medications, skin condition treatments, anti-inflammatory medications and cholesterol regulators. Other turmeric benefits include its ability to aid weight loss, treat gastrointestinal issues, ease pain and treat cancer naturally. (94)

95. Valerian Root
Valerian root comes from a plant that’s native in Europe and parts of Asia. The root is sold as a dry powdered extract in capsules, teas, tinctures and fluid extracts. Valerian root is commonly used as a natural sleep aid because of its sedative properties. It can also ease anxiety, lower blood pressure, improve your ability to deal with stress and ease menstrual cramps. (95)

96. Vanilla Extract
When vanilla beans are combined with alcohol, this makes a vanilla tincture or extract that’s added to recipes for flavor. But vanilla extract also comes with a slew of health benefits, including its ability to fight bacterial infections, reduce inflammation, boost your mental health, reduce fevers and improve cholesterol levels. (96)

97. Vervain
Vervain is an herb that can be found in powder, tincture, capsule and tea forms. Vervain has cardioprotective, antimicrobial, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, sedative and anti-anxiety properties. It can also be used to improve your gum health by using vervain and hot water as a mouthwash. (97)

98. Vitex (Chasteberry)
Vitex, which is also known as chasteberry, can be used to tone your body’s systems, positively affect your hormones and improve the health of your skin. Use vitex to relieve PMS symptoms, reduce uterine fibroids, improve female fertility, treat endometriosis, reduce menopause symptoms, remedy amenorrhea, treat an enlarged prostate and promote lactation in women who are breastfeeding. (98)

99. Wild Yam
Wild yam is an herb that’s also known as colic root. It can be found in dried root, liquid, tea, capsule and dried root powder forms. Wild yam benefits include its ability to regulate blood sugar levels, improve cholesterol levels, reduce hyperpigmentation, relieve symptoms of diverticulosis and help to fight cancer. (99)

100. Witch Hazel
Witch hazel is a plant and the leaves, twigs and bark are used to make a skin-healing astringent that’s used to reduce acne, skin inflammation, poison ivy and insect bites. Using witch hazel can also help to heal cracked skin, ingrown hairs, excess sweating, varicose veins, razor burn and hemorrhoids. (100)

101. Yarrow 
Yarrow is an herb and the leaves can be used fresh or dried for cooking. Yarrow can also be used to make infused vinegars and oils. Consuming yarrow can help to heal skin wounds, stop bleeding, aid amenorrhea, treat mastitis, reduce inflammation, ease anxiety, improve digestive issues, reduce blood pressure and ease asthma. (101)

Precautions
When herbs and spices are used for medicinal purposes and consumed in greater amounts than would normally be eaten in your everyday diet, talk to your doctor or nutritionist about the proper dose for your condition. Women who are pregnant or breastfeeding, and people taking conventional medications should also speak to their health care providers before supplementing with spices and herbs.
When shopping for supplements, choose a good quality product that’s made by a company that you trust. Choose organic options whenever possible and read the ingredient label and dose recommendations carefully.

Final Thoughts
Trying to relieve or prevent a health condition, but you don’t want to turn to conventional medications? Using herbs and spices for healing can help to treat a number of health conditions. These 101 herbs and spices boast an array of health benefits that are right at your fingertips.



Dr. Josh Axe, DNM, DC, CNS is a certified doctor of natural medicine, doctor of chiropractic and clinical nutritionist with a passion to help people get healthy by using food as medicine.  In 2008 he started Exodus Health Center, which grew to become one of the largest functional medicine clinics in the world.

Dr. Axe has created one of the top 10 most visited natural health websites in the world at www.DrAxe.com which has over 6,000,000 monthly visitors, where the main topics include nutrition, natural medicine, fitness, healthy recipes, home remedies and trending health news.
.

Abracadabra!

SUBHEAD: And so, shazzam: I give you the one-percent! And a bankrupt United States of America.

By James Kunstler on 11 December 2017 for Kunstler.com -
(http://kunstler.com/clusterfuck-nation/abracadabra/)


Image above: Face of a slot machine dubbed "Money Magic!" From (http://www.slotsup.com/free-slots-online/money-magic-rival).

And so, as they say in the horror movies, it begins…! The unwinding of the Federal Reserve’s balance sheet.

Such an esoteric concept! Is there one in ten thousand of the millions of people who sit at desks all day long from sea to shining sea who have a clue how this works? Or what its relationship is to the real world?

I confess, my understanding of it is incomplete and schematic at best — in the way that my understanding of a Las Vegas magic act might be. All the flash and dazzle conceals the magician’s misdirection.

The magician is either a scary supernatural being or a magnificent fraud.

Anyway, the audience ‘out there’ for the Federal Reserve’s magic act — x-million people preoccupied by their futures slipping away, their cars falling apart, their kid’s $53,000 college loan burden, or the $6,000 bill they just received for going to the emergency room with a cut finger — wouldn’t give a good goddamn even if they knew the Fed’s magic show was going on.

So, the Fed has this thing called a balance sheet, which is actually a computer file, filled with entries that denote securities that it holds.

These securities, mostly US government bonds of various categories and bundles of mortgages wrangled together by the mysterious government-sponsored entity called Freddie Mac, represent about $4.5 trillion in debt.

They’re IOUs that supposedly pay interest for a set number of years. When that term of years expires, the Fed gets back the money it loaned, which is called the principal. Ahhhh, here’s the cute part!

You see, the money that the Fed loaned to the US government (in exchange for a bond) was never there in the first place. The Fed prestidigitated it out of an alternate universe. They gave this money to a “primary dealer” bank in exchange for the bond, which the bank abracadabraed up for the US Treasury. Well, not really.

In fact, the Fed just made a notation on the bank’s “reserve” account that the money from the alternate universe appeared there.

Somehow that money was sent via a virtual pneumatic tube to the US Treasury, where it was used to pay for drones to blow up Yemeni wedding parties, and for the Secret Service to visit pole dancing bars when the president traveled to foreign lands.

Here’s the fun part. The Fed announces that it is going to shed this nasty debt, at about $10 billion worth a month starting this past October. Their stated goal is to reach an ultimate wind-down velocity of $50 billion a month (cue laugh track).

If they ever get there (cue laugh track) it would take 20 years to complete the wind-down.

The chance of that happening is about the same as the chance that Janet Yellen will come down your chimney on December 24 with a sack-full of chocolate Bitcoins. But never mind the long view for the moment.

One way they plan to accomplish this feat is to “roll off” the bonds. That is, when the bonds mature — i.e. come to the end of their term — they will cease to exist. Poof!

Wait a minute! When a bond matures, the issuer has to send the principal back to the lender.

After all, the Fed lent the US Treasury X-billion dollars, the US Treasury paid interest on the loan for X-years, and now it has to fork over the full value of the loan (hopefully in dollars that have magically inflated over the years and are now worth less than when they were borrowed — another magic trick!). But that doesn’t happen.

Instead, when the theoretical principal is returned to the Fed, the Fed disappears the money, like the girl in a bikini onstage who enters the magician’s sacred box and vanishes.

Now you see her, now you don’t. The explanation, of course, might be that the money was never really there in the first place, so it makes sense to fire it back to the alternative universe it came from.

Well, uh, I guess….

The catch is: for a while it was here on earth and folks were doing stuff with it, such as the aforementioned drone strikes and pole dancers.

Not only that, but the “primary dealer” banks were allowed to loan out ten times the reserve minimum denoted on their Fed accounts for participating in the scheme. Who did they lend all that money to?

Apparently, a lot of it went to corporations who borrowed it at ultra-low interest rates in order to buy back their own stock, which paid dividends way higher than the interest rate they borrowed at to buy the stuff, and which also pumped up the share value of the stocks, which also happened to make the executives of the corporations way richer in terms of their stock options and bonuses (awarded for boosting the share value of the stock!).

And so, shazzam: I give you the one-percent! And a bankrupt United States of America.

And don’t even ask about all those bundles of janky Freddie Mac mortgages fobbed off on the Fed.

The reason they did that in the first place was because those mortgages weren’t being paid off, and the banks and insurance companies that held them were choking to death on them.

So they parked them in a crawl space under the Fed’s Eccles Building in Washington, hoping they would just turn to compost And guess what: they’re no more valuable now then they were then. File that one under Necrophilia.

.

Climate Change and our children

SUBHEAD: How to help my daughter face Climate Change with an open heart.

By Chris Moore-Backman on 9 December 2017 for TruthOut-
(http://www.truth-out.org/opinion/item/42845-how-to-help-my-daughter-face-climate-change-with-an-open-heart)


Image above: A firefighter battles a wildfire as it burns along a hillside near homes in Santa Paula, California, on December 5, 2017. From original article.
You are the bows from which your children as living arrows are sent forth.
The archer sees the mark upon the path of the infinite,
and He bends you with His might that His arrows may go swift and far.
Let your bending in the archer's hand be for gladness;
For even as He loves the arrow that flies, so He loves also the bow that is stable.
~Kahlil Gibran
When the wildfires were still raging in California, my 12-year-old daughter and I rode Amtrak north from Oakland to Sacramento. Nearing Berkeley, we caught our first glimpse of the gray-brown wall of smoke issuing in from Sonoma, Napa, Lake, Mendocino, Butte, and Solano counties.

After riding 10 or so miles further on, the illusion of the wall suddenly dissipated, and we found ourselves speeding along in a fog of fine ash, our train blanketed in its opaque haze.

Gazing into the smoke, my daughter seated beside me, I considered the stark difference our awareness of global warming created between my childhood and hers. And I felt a deep anxiety stir in my belly.

What happens to a child's psyche, I asked myself, as she gradually absorbs the knowledge that our planet is warming at a terrifying rate and to an unimaginably dangerous degree, then quietly observes the adults in her life, particularly those most responsible for caring for and protecting her, doing the very things that are causing the emergency?

What happens as she observes the mundane spectrum of everyday life in the United States amid climate chaos: as dad pulls the car up to the pump, as mom comes home from the airport after a business trip, as the family sits down to another meat and factory farm-based dinner, iPhones at the ready and the thermostat cranked to 70?

I turned my gaze from the smoke and looked again at the book in my lap, Being the Change: Live Well and Spark a Climate Revolution, by climate scientist Peter Kalmus. The page I had been reading would eventually lead to here: "Few people respond to facts… While intellect certainly plays a role, it's a rather small one. Our dire ecological crisis calls us to go deeper."



In his famous meditation on children, Kahlil Gibran likens parents to the bows of the divine archer, from which children, like arrows, are sent forth into the mystery of their own souls and futures. The beloved bow, Gibran attests, sends the arrow swift and far, by bending to the archer's strength, while at the same time remaining stable.

Such flexible stability is what I long to achieve as a parent -- a certain rootedness and strength of purpose, mediated by gentleness. It's what I believe I need if I'm going to accompany my daughter as she learns to face the coming storms -- and fires -- with her eyes and heart open.

So it is that I'm gravitating toward the solace and instruction of other dads these days, the more humble and down-to-earth the better. Kalmus, father of two young sons, is one such dad.

"At first, we didn't know what we were doing. It was reasonable for us to start burning fossil fuels," Kalmus says early on in Being the Change. "However, now we do know what we're doing."

It's an exquisitely sane point of departure for the author's first book, which reads as an openhearted letter to anyone deeply concerned about global warming and at all cognizant of how quickly the climate change clock is ticking.  

Being the Change details Kalmus' process of bringing his daily life into alignment with his conscience -- a process that carries some very welcome side effects: namely, a carbon footprint weighing in at one-tenth the US average, greater happiness, and deepened connections with loved ones and life itself.

As a climate expert utterly in the know about humanity's devastating impact on the health of the biosphere (see Chapter 3), and with as clear a picture as can be had about where our civilization's carbon addiction is leading (see Chapter 4), Kalmus eventually proves no match for the cognitive dissonance he experiences because of his own outsized carbon footprint.

His chosen response is refreshingly straightforward: "If fossil fuels cause global warming, and I don't want global warming," he writes, "then I should reduce my fossil fuel use."

Although there's zero evidence that Gandhi ever wrote or uttered the most popular phrase attributed to him -- "Be the change you wish to see in the world" -- the sentiment is distinctly Gandhian. Finding congruence between our deepest convictions and our outward behavior, according to this adage, is the true measure of our genuine happiness, and of our contribution to the world. It's an old and simple idea:
 When it comes to social change, how we live our lives is of paramount importance. In India, Gandhi captured the heart of a massive social movement with his own rendering of this basic philosophy.
 
"Nobility of soul," he summarized in a letter to his cousin, "consists in realizing that you are yourself India. In your emancipation is the emancipation of India. All else is make believe."
What makes Being the Change important is not Kalmus' restatement of this age-old tenet, but his plainspoken description of putting it into concrete practice. He offers thorough, humbly stated guidance on establishing new daily practices which, step by step, can break a person free from the carbon-heavy status quo.

What's more, through his inspiring and often funny anecdotes about his homespun experiments aimed at paring down -- things like bicycling , growing food, meditating, embracing a vegetarian diet, and renouncing air travel -- Kalmus illustrates that overcoming our addiction to fossil fuels isn't a path of puritanical self-mortification.

Rather, low-energy living (low-energy being Kalmus' corrective for green, because of its insidious consumerist implications) can be a deeply satisfying adventure, calling for equal parts creativity and fun.

Boiled down, the path Kalmus advocates is based on two simple and, if we're open to them, life-changing premises.

The first is that burning fossil fuel causes harm. According to Kalmus, this harm will last for around 100,000 years -- 10 million years if we count reduced biodiversity (and why shouldn't we?). The reason he has taken what to many people looks like radical steps to avoid burning fossil fuel is that he doesn't like causing harm.

This connection is obvious intellectually, but most people, and society, have not taken this in deeply enough to change their actions to any significant degree. Kalmus, the dad, however, feels this connection in his gut.

 "Burning fossil fuels should be unacceptable socially," he says, "the way physical assault is unacceptable. The harm it does is less immediate, but just as real." Who could argue that future generations -- likely our own children and grandchildren -- as they suffer the consequences of our negligence, will see this as plainly as we see the immorality of chattel slavery today.

The second basic premise of Being the Change is that burning less fossil fuel makes for a happier life. Despite every message to the contrary trumpeted by our consumption-driven society, this appears to be the normal experience of those following similar paths, not the exception.

On these two premises rests a path of radical personal transformation with deep implications for the collective. 

"Using less energy at the global scale would reduce our greenhouse gas emissions, and serve as a bridge to a future without fossil fuels," Kalmus says. "Using less energy in our individual lives," he further (and to my mind most importantly) asserts, "would equip us with the mindset, skills, and the systems we'll need in this post-fossil-fuel world."



Returning my gaze to the smoke, it occurred to me: As soon as the wildfires ran their deadly course, clean up, then construction, would immediately follow. The set would be quickly and efficiently reconstructed according to the same basic blueprint used before. And the reconstruction would undoubtedly be touted as evidence of inspiring community-resiliency, and probably of a certain American spirit, rugged and purportedly unique to us.

It occurred to me also, holding Being the Change in my hands on that smoke-immersed train with my beloved child beside me, that Peter Kalmus has provided us with a different blueprint, and he's shown through his own experimentation that we have the capacity to choose it, and to use it. On the cusp of climate catastrophe, we are neither choiceless nor powerless.

At bottom, I read Being the Change as the testament of a father trying to do right by his kids -- a testament that leaves me with a much different set of questions about the psychic wellness of our children.

In the face of the climate emergency, what would it do to their psyches to see us, their parents and other adult caregivers, pouring our hearts into the work of personal and societal transformation, on behalf of people we will never meet?

On behalf of all other living beings, the rivers and trees and soil?

What if our children saw us respond to this crisis with maturity, sanity, and integrity? With the flexible stability of Gibran's bow? What would it do to them, for them, if we came into resonance with our own souls?

.

Strafing run at Salt Pond Beach

SUBHEAD: Lifeguards on duty thought the military helicopters were a clear danger to the public.

By Juan Wilson on 9 December 2017 for Island Breath -
(http://islandbreath.blogspot.com/2017/12/strafing-run-at-salt-pond.html)


Image above: Attack helicopter traverses Salt Pond Beach Park at low altitude from east to west as beachgoers watch. Photo by Juan Wilson.

This is the second time I have witnessed what amounts to practice strafing runs over an occupied county public beach park on Kauai, Hawaii. It is not welcomed.

Below are images and a short video that caught on my iPod as two military helicopters flying low and hot in at least four passes from east to west and back over Burns Field.

Burns is an unregulated airstrip at Puolo Point shared by small private civilian and commercial aircraft. There is no control tower, personnel or traffic regulation at the fields.


Image above: Vehicles park along fence of Burns Field for access to beach for swimming and fishing. Photo by Juan Wilson.

These maneuvers brought them over the Salt Pond Beach area including a sandy beach and ocean swimming area occupied by tourists and locals that often park near the end of the Burns Field runway.

The helicopter's last pass was from west to east and ended at about 50ft altitude over the water's edge.

I spoke to the lifeguards on duty at the time. They were appalled by the risks of flying so low over a swimming area. They thought it clearly a danger to the public.

One aircraft appeared to be a UH-60 Black Hawk and the other a Bell Cobra attack helicopter, both used by the US Army.


Image above: Attack helicopter heading west over water of Salt Pond Beach Park in one of at least four low runs at Burn's Field. From (https://youtu.be/dQvwrn8EMPQ).

The Navy operates two 7,000 foot runways with a control tower and safety equipment just a few miles away. Why can't the Army make what look like strafing runs there? Is it because they would have to ask permission of the Navy and might be turned down?

These copters likely flew from Oahu - Likely from the US Army's Schofield Barracks airfield.

See also:


.

Stop Navy killing marine mammals

SOURCE: Koohan Paik (koohanpaik@gmail.com)
SUBHEAD:  Tell the Navy to examine alternatives that would limit activities harmful to marine mammals.

By Dave Henkin on 6 December 2017 for Earth Justice -
(https://secure.earthjustice.org/site/SPageNavigator/P2A_NavySonar.html)


Image above: Outrigger canoe tries to keep this pod of pilot whales from beaching at Kalapaki on Kauai - five of them died. From (http://www.hawaiinewsnow.com/story/36592433/officials-investigating-several-whales-stranded-at-kauais-kalapaki-beach).

The key to reducing harm to marine mammals is to restrict harmful Navy activities in sensitive marine habitat.

Unfortunately, the Navy proposes stripping protections from critical areas.

Thousands of whales, dolphins and other marine mammals could suffer permanent injury—and even death—from warfare training exercises if the Navy walks back their agreement to a reasonable testing and training plan.

Over the next five years, the Navy wants to fire tens of thousands of rockets, missiles and projectiles and blast sonar for tens of thousands of hours in waters off Hawai‘i and Southern California that are home to dozens of vulnerable marine mammal species.

To marine mammals, the deafening sounds from Navy activities can be fatal. In the dark depths of the ocean, these mammals rely almost entirely on sound to “see” their world. It’s how they feed, mate, communicate and navigate. If a whale or dolphin can’t hear, it can’t survive.

Before the Navy can adopt its testing and training plan, it needs to consider public input under the National Environmental Policy Act, or NEPA. You have only until December 12 to tell the Navy to commit to a reasonable plan that achieves military preparedness while maximizing marine mammal safety.


Image above: Two dying pilot whales on the sand at Kalapaki Beach. From (http://www.hawaiinewsnow.com/story/36592433/officials-investigating-several-whales-stranded-at-kauais-kalapaki-beach).

After a landmark settlement with Earthjustice in 2015, the Navy voluntarily agreed to safeguards for whales, dolphins and other marine mammals, protecting vast swaths of vital ocean habitat. But these common sense measures are conspicuously missing from Navy’s draft plan for the next five years of training and testing around the Hawaiian Islands and off Southern California.

The settlement proved that the Navy can both protect our nation and minimize harm to whales and dolphins by limiting the use of sonar and explosives in vital habitats.

The waters off the coast of Southern California are a globally important feeding area for endangered whales, and, for numerous small, resident whale and dolphin populations off Hawai‘i, the islands are literally their only home.

For years, scientists have documented that mid-frequency sonar wreaks havoc on the ocean environment, causing serious impacts to marine mammals, such as permanent hearing loss, lung injuries, strandings, habitat abandonment and even death.

The Navy already acknowledged that it doesn’t need to train in every square inch of the ocean and that it can take reasonable steps to reduce the deadly toll of its activities. Tell it to examine and pursue alternatives that protect both the nation and irreplaceable marine life.

See also: 
Ea O Ka Aina: Air Force plans to bomb whales 2/6/17
Ea O Ka Aina: Hawaiian spinner dolphin restriction 1/9/17
Ea O Ka Aina: Navy to dump 20K tons of poison 11/16/16
Ea O Ka Aina: PMRF injuring marine mammals10/9/16
Ea O Ka Aina: Judgement against RIMPAC 2016 5/29/16
Ea O Ka Aina: US court RIMPAC Impact decision 4/3/15
Ea O Ka Aina: PMRF RIMPAC Claptrap 11/22/14
Ea O Ka Aina: RIMPAC 2014 - another whale death 7/26/14
Ea O Ka Aina: Navy Injury & Death Toll 3/19/14
Ea O Ka Aina: Navy License to Kill 10/9/12
Ea O Ka Aina: Navy admits threat to sea mammals 5/10/12
Ea O Ka Aina: Talk on Ocean Noise 12/28/11
Ea O Ka Aina: Navy to kill Pacific whales 1/17/09

The Archipelago of Hope

SUBHEAD: The “complete rebirth on the land” becomes a real option for all communities facing climate change.

By Nich Triolo on 28 November 2017 for Orion Magazine -
(https://orionmagazine.org/2017/11/eight-questions-author-gleb-raygorodetsky-archipelago-hope/)


Image above: On sacred Ukok Plateau, Maria Amanchina, a traditional Altai shaman and healer, lights a pipe to send her prayers with the smoke to the Sky, the Land, and the Spirit of Altai. From original article.

To celebrate the recent launch of an important and relevant new book, The Archipelago of Hope, I reached out to its author, Gleb Raygorodetsky, to learn more.

Born and raised in a small village on the Bering Sea coast of Kamchatka Peninsula, USSR, Gleb immigrated to the United States in 1988. He made his way from New York City to Fairbanks, Alaska, where he continued his studies in wildlife biology.

Since then, Gleb has traversed the Americas, from Canada’s Beaufort Sea to the Brazilian Amazon, from the Andes to the shores of Lake Superior, living with Indigenous peoples as diverse as Aleut fur seal hunters, Amazonian Caboclos pirarucu fishermen, and the Gwich’in caribou hunters.

After earning his PhD in ecology, evolution and environmental biology, he continued working with Indigenous groups around the world. Gleb has written and contributed to books and scientific articles on Indigenous issues, traditional knowledge, and conservation in both English and Russian.

He wrote Gwich’in Words about the Landa book on the Indigenous ecological knowledge of Gwich’in people in the Northwest Territories. He has also written popular articles on Indigenous and environmental issues for various magazines.

Gleb is a co-founder of Conversations with the Earth (CWE)—an Indigenous-led multimedia initiative that amplifies Indigenous voices in the discourse on climate change.

1) Your recent book is called The Archipelago of Hope. Can you give us a synopsis on what the book is about and how the word “archipelago” made it into the title? 

The Indigenous communities and their traditional territories are the islands of biocultural diversity in the ever-rising sea of development and urbanization. The Archipelago of Hope takes readers on a journey to explore the inextricable links between Indigenous cultures and their lands, and how they form the foundation for climate change resilience around the world.

Indigenous peoples have a millennia-long track record of maintaining intimate relationships with the natural world, which has nourished their communities and sustained their cultures. This is the track record that they have maintained despite formidable odds, including multiple “izations”—colonization, Christianization, sedentarization, and globalization.

What makes Indigenous communities indispensible in the search for climate change solutions is that their ancestral territories are the “living laboratories,” where the traditional practices and understanding of nature meet modern technology and scientific insights, generating new knowledge critical for developing relevant climate change responses.

2) You are an expert in the field of “biocultural diversity” conservation. Can you define this field and tell us how you entered into this sort of work?

In recent years, a number of integrative disciplines—systems science, resilience science, ecosystem health, ethnoecology, deep ecology, Gaia Theory, and others—have sought ways to advance our understanding of the relationships between people and nature, incorporating insights from both the biological and social sciences as well as Indigenous knowledge.

Various organizations working on biodiversity conservation, cultural preservation, and sustainable development are increasingly relying on such holistic approaches in their work. Out of all these approaches, biocultural diversity has particularly resonated with me.

Biocultural diversity is a product of millennia of coevolutionary relationships between humans and their surroundings, when people rely on their environment for survival while adapting to and modifying it.


Image above: Inside a Nenets herders’ traditional tent, Gosha Khudi is taking a break from his daily chores and checks text messages on his cell phone. A young reindeer doe, a survivor of the 2013–2014 “rain-on-snow” extreme weather event, hides from mosquitos. From original article.

3) Can you explain Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK), and how it’s being used (or not) when making important climate and environmental policy today? 

TEK is the cumulative body of knowledge, practices, and beliefs about the relationships between people, other living beings, and their environment, handed down through generations through oral and hands-on transmission.

It provides valid and practical information about various ecological processes including, for example, daily movements of animals, their seasonal distribution, and multi-year changes in abundance.

TEK-based monitoring allows for timely detection of environmental changes, and development of appropriate community responses that help maintain the integrity of local social-ecological systems.

Until recently, TEK has been largely ignored, but increasingly it has been recognized for its important contributions to such fields as wildlife conservation, land use planning, environmental monitoring, and human wellbeing.

New emerging frameworks, such as Multiple Evidence Based approach, creates a platform for an equitable knowledge co-production. By focusing on the complementarity of diverse knowledge systems based on both Indigenous and scientific knowledge systems, this leads to better decision-making on multiple scales. 


4) What are some takeaway lessons you learned while immersed in Indigenous communities to discuss such global challenges as climate change?

All of the Indigenous peoples featured in the book are intimately aware of the web of relationships that sustains them and their traditional territories.

The interdependence of animate and inanimate, spiritual and physical, past and future, rights and responsibilities, traditional knowledge and science, are fundamentally important for sustaining our planet’s biocultural diversity.

Despite everything the modern world has thrown at them, the Indigenous peoples I profiled have found ways to persevere and even thrive, by keeping their links to the land and other living beings.

What makes these Indigenous communities resilient is that their stewardship of the land is based on Respect, Reciprocity, and Reverence (3Rs) to each other, their neighbors, and the Earth.

Traditional territories of Indigenous peoples continue to support the majority of the earth’s remaining biological and cultural diversity, intact forests, undammed rivers, and ecosystem services, which are fundamental for regulating the climate.

Recognizing Indigenous peoples’ inherent rights to fulfill the responsibilities of looking after their traditional territories—the obligations they inherited from their ancestors—is a prerequisite for sustaining the resilience of these places.

5) What’s next?

My hope is that The Archipelago of Hope becomes more than just words on paper, that it turns into flagstones on a road to healing, reconciliation, and positive transformation.

I am working with my long-term partners to create outreach program and a community-focused traveling exhibition program that would enable Indigenous community members to share their own stories with one another, their neighbors, decision-makers, and the broader global community.

We are also establishing “The Archipelago of Hope Indigenous Resilience Fund,” so that any profits earned from the book sales, as well as any donations to the projects profiled in the book, can go directly to the relevant communities, their representative organizations, or their partners.

So that eventually, in the words of my friend and teacher Tero Mustonen, the “complete rebirth on the land” becomes a real option for all communities facing climate change.



Video above: Promotional video for "Archipelago of Hope: Wisdom and Resilience from the Edge of Climate Change". From original article (https://youtu.be/yx0WbK5pDdg).

Visit the Official Website.
Explore Facebook, and Twitter.
Listen to WNYC Studios feature.
Read an excerpt from the book at Cultural Survival.
.